Photo a day special update #18 – #31!

Happy Halloween! Join us on The Ride Through The Murky Air! This 19th century illustration shows a witch and passenger flying through the air on a broomstick. Trick or treat?

Happy Halloween! Join us on The Ride Through The Murky Air! This 19th century illustration shows a witch and passenger flying through the air on a broomstick. Trick or treat?

Bookworm alert! The final photo in our celebration of Manchester Science Festival. We held a Family Fun Afternoon where visitors enjoyed making bugs and pests from craft materials! Check out the Events at the The John Rylands Library web page for more details on upcoming events.

Bookworm alert! The final photo in our celebration of Manchester Science Festival. We held a Family Fun Afternoon where visitors enjoyed making bugs and pests from craft materials! Check out the Events at the The John Rylands Library web page for more details on upcoming events.

The final photo in our series of Chinese paintings to mark the Asia Triennial, Manchester, Harmonious Society exhibition at The John Rylands Library. This beautiful 18th century painting depicts Chinese musicians with musical instruments.

The final photo in our series of Chinese paintings to mark the Asia Triennial, Manchester, Harmonious Society exhibition at The John Rylands Library. This beautiful 18th century painting depicts Chinese musicians with musical instruments.

Check out this atmospheric illustration from a 200 year old science paper ‘On the Expansion of Elastic Fluids by Heat’.

Check out this atmospheric illustration from a 200 year old science paper ‘On the Expansion of Elastic Fluids by Heat’.

Did you go sober for Stoptober? This extract from a Temperance scrapbook depicts the physical and moral consequences of drinking alcohol.

Did you go sober for Stoptober? This extract from a Temperance scrapbook depicts the physical and moral consequences of drinking alcohol.

Death and the devil creeping up.

Death and the devil creeping up.

African women from the Dahomy kingdom (present-day Ghana) in the memoirs of Archibald Dalzel, Governor at Cape-Coast Castle, one of the slave trade castles used by the Brits in 1700.

African women from the Dahomy kingdom (present-day Ghana) in
the memoirs of Archibald Dalzel, Governor at Cape-Coast Castle, one of the slave trade castles used by the Brits in 1700.

Morbid histology classes at The University of Manchester ‘Pathologial Department’ in 1900!

Morbid histology classes at The University of Manchester ‘Pathologial Department’ in 1900!

A sumptuous image mirroring Diwali with its colours and reflecting light. Illumination comes in various guises.

A sumptuous image mirroring Diwali with its colours and reflecting light. Illumination comes in various guises.

What a fantastic machine! Manchester at the forefront of science with Ernest Rutherford and Hans Geiger.

What a fantastic machine! Manchester at the forefront of science with Ernest Rutherford and Hans Geiger.

Cutting edge 17th century science! An Indian treatise on hydraulics & pneumatics showing fluid flow (we think!). If you know better or have any other ideas let us know.

Cutting edge 17th century science! An Indian treatise on hydraulics & pneumatics showing fluid flow (we think!). If you know better or have any other ideas let us know.

Illustration of Miao performers with masks and instruments. This art was produced for the Chinese market rather than the West.

Illustration of Miao performers with masks and instruments. This art was produced for the Chinese market rather than the West.

Here’s the penultimate page of Gaskell's handwritten manuscript, Wives & Daughters. Gaskell sadly died before finishing it. Gaskell’s House reopened to the public on 5th October.

Here’s the penultimate page of Gaskell’s handwritten manuscript, Wives & Daughters. Gaskell sadly died before finishing it. Gaskell’s House reopened to the public on 5th October.

Peacock wrote ‘Nightmare Abbey’ so here’s a spooky photo of our cloistered corridor at the #johnrylands from 1900

Peacock wrote ‘Nightmare Abbey’ so here’s a spooky photo of our cloistered corridor at the #johnrylands from 1900

Photo a Day #16

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It’s World Food Day! What are you feasting on?

It’s World Food Day! What are you feasting on?

Library acquires an autograph John Wesley letter, lost to public view since the 1840s

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Gareth Lloyd writes:

The Library has recently purchased from a private owner a significant handwritten letter written by the Methodist leader John Wesley (1703-91). The letter, which is dated 8 August 1788, was written to Walter Churchey, a prominent layman and solicitor of Hay on Wye.

Letter from John Wesley to Walter Churchey. English MS 1400/18.

Letter from John Wesley to Walter Churchey. English MS 1400/18.

Letter from John Wesley to Walter Churchey. English MS 1400/18.

Letter from John Wesley to Walter Churchey. English MS 1400/18.

The text of the letter was published in 1842 in an edition of John Wesley’s works by the historian Thomas Jackson and this copy was subsequently republished in the standard edition of Wesley’s correspondence edited by Thomas Telford, published in 1931. However, the autograph letter itself vanished from public view after its publication by Jackson and was unavailable to scholarship until its recent acquisition by the John Rylands Library.

In the letter (ref. English MS 1400/18), Wesley displays the broad range of interests for which he was well-known, critiquing Churchey’s poetic compositions and his ability as a translator. Wesley also reveals an in-depth knowledge of popular literary taste and the book trade, which is hardly surprising when one considers that he was among the most prolific writers, editors and publishers of the 18th century. An inventory of the contents of the Wesleyan Book Room carried out as part of the administration of Wesley’s estate, listed over 250,000 volumes awaiting nationwide distribution.

This letter provides valuable insight into the personality and attributes of a man who was described in the secular Gentleman’s Magazine as one of the “most remarkable men of the age”.

Photo a Day #15

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Siege of Troy. Book three: Hector and Paris fight Achilles and Diomedes

Siege of Troy. Book three: Hector and Paris fight Achilles and Diomedes

Photo a Day #14

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This is the smallest book in the world!! Here is a photo of the one from our collections.

This is the smallest book in the world!! Here is a photo of the one from our collections.

Photo a Day #13

JRL1500570 Today is the launch of The John Rylands Research Institute. Did you see this image in the news recently? One of our researchers discovered an extremely rare early Christian charm. This 1,500 year-old papyrus fragment is the first known reference to the Last Supper in a magical context, find out more here.

Wesley Figures See The Light!

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Wesley Scultpure

Rylands Collection of John Wesley scultpure.

The Visual Collections Department have recently rehoused some of the Wesley ceramics and sculpture that the Library holds. These figures have been moved from cupboards behind the scenes into storage in the Crawford Room and are arousing quite a lot of curiosity with members of the public. So, although they are in a public area of the building they haven’t been placed for display or exhibition, but to utilize space.

John Wesley Preaching

John Wesley Preaching

Most of these portraits are of John Wesley (1703-91). He was a Church of England clergyman and the religious leader that founded Methodism. These portraits date from the 1780s to the early 20th century. Ceramics are objects that are made from clay that has been shaped while wet and then hardened by ‘firing’ at high temperatures. Fired clay is used to create both functional and decorative objects. Most of these portraits are earthenware, which is fired at relatively low temperatures. The clay particles are only partly fused together and there are pores between them. Earthenware is particularly prone to staining, because liquids can penetrate the body of the object through the pores. Some of the portraits of Wesley have been left unglazed after the initial ‘biscuit firing’ and appear red-brown. Most of these have been embellished with polychromatic glazes.

These were made in Staffordshire, the centre of the Potteries. Staffordshire figures were generally considered to be ornaments. They were made to commemorate people and events such as military campaigns, royal births, politicians and theatrical characters. They were often produced at very little cost, sometimes children were paid as little as 10 Pence a day to create them and so people could acquire them cheaply from street markets and country fairs.

 

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Today, looking at Staffordshire figures can tell us about the characters that were popular, as well as the people and events that were important to ordinary people in the 19th century. They reflected people’s allegiances, in this case their Methodist affiliations. The two figures that garner the most fascination are the ones created from the cervical vertebrae of a horse, as seen above, which are then painted to depict Wesley preaching. Their function is ambiguous – on the one hand, demand for images of Wesley was so great that it outstripped supply so devotees were compelled to use their ingenuity. On the other hand, it is possible that effigies like these were made by Wesley’s detractors and were put in pubs where they were soaked in ale in defiance of his calls for temperance.

Photo a Day #12

jrl030532trThe second in our series of Chinese paintings to mark the Asia Triennial Manchester Harmonious Society exhibition at The John Rylands. This is a painting of a man selling musical instruments, flutes and 2-stringed bowed fiddles. Harmonious or what?!

Photo a Day #11

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Rustam and the dragon from Ferdowsi’s epic poem, Shahnama.

Rustam and the dragon from Ferdowsi’s epic poem, Shahnama.

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